Golconda diamond expected to sell for over $15 million

Golconda diamond expected to sell for over $15 million.
A 76-carat diamond billed as one of the most famous in the world is expected to fetch well over $15 million when it hits the auction block in November. The colossal gem, which Christie's said was the finest and largest perfect Golconda diamond ever to appear at auction, is perfect in color and internally flawless. (Reuters)




A model holds the "Archduke Joseph" historial diamond on October 3, 2012 during a Christie's auction preview in Geneva. Once part of the collection of the Archduke Joseph of Austria (1872-1962), the D color diamond, weighing 76,02 carats and mined at the legendary Indian Golkonda mine, is expected to reach between 15 million and 20 million US dollars at an auction on November 13 in Geneva. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI

The legendary Golconda mines in India produced some of the world's most famous diamonds, including the Koh-i-Noor" Rahul Kadakia, head of jewelry for Christie's Americas and Switzerland. The diamond is named the Archduke Joseph Diamond, after one of its former owners.

Take a look at some more diamonds that made news recently.

Martian Pink
Extremely rare Martian Pink diamond,the largest ever to hit the auction market was sold for over double its original estimate for $17.4m through auction house Christie's.The "Martian Pink", a 12.04-carat Fancy Intense pink (Type IIa) diamond, is shown during a media preview at Christie's.

The "Martian Pink" was named by American jeweller Ronald Winston in 1976.
Photo Credit: Christie's

The Clark Pink
A rare 9-carat pink diamond ring, known as "the Clark Pink" and belonging to Huguette Clark is shown in this undated handout photo. Jewels belonging to Clark, who was dubbed the "reluctant heiress" after choosing to spend her final years living in hospitals instead of her lavish homes, sold for $21 million at auction. The rare pink diamond ring that fetched more than $15 million, nearly twice its high pre-sale estimate, was the top item in the sale at Christie's on April 17, 2012, which had been expected to total about $10 million. REUTERS/Christie's/Handout

Argyle Siren
A Rio Tinto 1.32 carat square radiant pink diamond known as the Argyle Siren, which could easily fetch over 1 million USD, is seen in Hong Kong on September 20, 2012. The mining giant Rio Tinto recently this year found a 12.76 carat pink diamond in Australia and is showcasing a batch of rare diamonds in Hong Kong as it seeks to tap into the booming Chinese jewellery market. AFP PHOTO / AARON TAM

Beau Sancy
An employee of Sotheby's auctioneers displays the Beau Sancy diamond during a media preview in Zurich May 2, 2012. The historic 34.98 carat diamond, which has an estimate of $2-4million, was owned by several during the last 400 years and will be offered in a Sotheby's auction of jewels in Geneva on May 15. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann

Beau Sancy
An employee of Sotheby's auctioneers displays the Beau Sancy diamond during a media preview in Zurich May 2, 2012. The historic 34.98 carat diamond, which has an estimate of $2-4million, was owned by several during the last 400 years and will be offered in a Sotheby's auction of jewels in Geneva on May 15. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann

Sun-drop diamond
A Sotheby's employee holds a 110.03 carat sun-drop diamond on October 24, 2011 in London, England. The diamond is the largest yellow pear-shaped diamond in the world, and is expected to fetch between $11-15 Million USD when it is sold at auction at Sotheby's Auction house in London. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Sun-drop diamond
A Sotheby's employee holds a 110.03 carat sun-drop diamond on October 24, 2011 in London, England. The diamond is the largest yellow pear-shaped diamond in the world, and is expected to fetch between $11-15 Million USD when it is sold at auction at Sotheby's Auction house in London. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Argyle Pink Jubilee
Mining group Rio Tinto has unearthed an extremely rare pink diamond, Australia's biggest rough pink diamond weighing 12.76 carats at its Argyle mine.

Argyle Pink Jubilee
More than 90 percent of the world's pink diamonds come from the Argyle mine in the East Kimberley region in the far northeast area of Western Australia.The diamond, discovered in the Argyle open pit, will be known as The Argyle Pink Jubilee, Rio Tinto said in a statement. It is a light pink diamond, similar to The Williamson Pink, the diamond Britain's Queen Elizabeth received as a wedding gift and which was later set into a brooch for her Coronation.
Text Courtesy : REUTERS

A rare pink diamond is handled by a Rio Tinto Diamond employee during a private viewing of 65 pink diamonds that are going on sale during the annual Rio Tinto Diamonds Argyle Pink Diamond Tender in New York, 01 October 2007. The world's most exclusive diamond sale features 65 of the world's rarest pink diamonds from the Argyle mine in Australia, with potential buyers, ranging from celebrities, jewelers and collectors, secretly putting their bids in sealed envelopes in hope to acquire one or more of the rare diamonds. Pink diamonds can reach a price 50 times higher than white diamonds with a starting bidding price of 400,000 USD per carat. AFP PHOTO/Emmanuel DUNAND

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